The Ukrainian Museum and Archives Reopens to Teach and Celebrate Ukrainians in the United States

In the early evening of Friday, August 13th, we went to the re-opening of the Ukrainian Museum and Archives on Kenilworth Avenue in Tremont which is devoted to the preservation and sharing of Ukrainian culture as well as the immigrant experience.

Along these lines, we visited with Mr. Michael G. Dobronos, member of the board of directors, who told us of new plans to build a conservatory lab which will allow the collection of documents/letters/artifacts to expand.

We also got to say hello to our good friend, Mr. Andrew Fedynsky, Director Emeritus and Resident Scholar, who showed us a beautiful new painting, on the outside wall of the archives building, of a “vinok” or flowery wreath that is worn by young girls or unmarried women in traditional Ukrainian culture. We understand that the artist was Ms. Taiisa Kulyk, a student from Harvard, who created it in a very short period.

Within the archives building, itself, was a collection of Ukrainian “kilims” or floor rugs that were both stylish and beautiful while the placards that documented the kilims’ history and significance were quite informative.

In fact, the term “beautiful” could also be applied to the bandura playing of Ms. Kvitka Sozanska, a renowned instrumentalist, who entertained us inside of the main room of the museum where we gathered for refreshments.

Before we left, we got to meet Mr. Daniel Jarosewich, a Walsh Jesuit High School student and UMA intern, who created a walking tour of Tremont highlighting businesses that were once owned by people who immigrated to the United States from the Ukraine.

During the tour, Mr. Jarosewich shows the buildings as they were years ago as opposed to present times.  To be sure, this is quite an ambitious undertaking, and we commend the young man for his hard work.

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